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Hurricanes

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From Hurricane Harvey to Hurricane Irma to Hurricane Jose and now Hurricane Maria, the past few weeks have been full of natural disasters.

 

Hurricane Harvey was a category 4 hurricane when it hit land. With winds of 130 miles per hour, Harvey dropped around 40-52 inches of rain. A lot of damage was done to Texas, especially southeastern Texas. After Hurricane Harvey hit Texas, Hurricane Irma formed and became a large threat in the Atlantic.

 

Irma was also a category 4 hurricane with winds of 130 miles per hour. Irma was bigger than the state of Florida, and Kevin Loria reported that “[Irma] set a new record for the amount of cyclone energy generated in a single day, and for maintaining wind speeds of 185 mph for 37 straight hours. Its eye, which expanded overnight between Thursday and Friday, [was] wide enough that peak winds could arrive at both sides of the Florida peninsula at the same time.”

 

Hurricane Jose came quickly after Irma, and it took shape and direction during Irma’s destruction. Beau Evans from NOLA.com says, “Hurricane Jose strengthened from a tropical storm into a hurricane blowing maximum sustained winds near 75 mph Wednesday afternoon (Sept. 6), according to the National Hurricane Center. Marking the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season’s 10th named storm, Jose follows on the heels of Hurricane Irma, a powerful Category 5 storm that on Wednesday began pounding islands in the Caribbean Sea. In an advisory issued at 4 p.m. Wednesday, the hurricane center said Jose is located about 1,000 miles east of the Caribbean and is heading west-northwestward around 16 mph. Forecasters expect Jose to continue along that track until a high-pressure ridge also influencing Irma’s course is pushed out by a trough over the next few days, allowing both hurricanes to take a northern turn.”   People from Florida to the Caribbean islands were all affected with power being out for several weeks and houses being flooded the mayor asked everyone for an emergency evacuation due to the hurricanes.

 

Now Maria has wreaked havoc on Puerto Rico, also a hurricane with category 4 strength. Over time, Maria turned into a category 1 near North Carolina and should hit near North Carolina sometime this week. The details regarding the full damage of the storm have not been released yet.

 

Many hurricanes have come from the Atlantic lately which makes us wonder – will there be any more hurricanes to come? Will Mobile and the rest of the Gulf Coast be hit? For now, the answer is no, but we can only try to lend our aid to Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico.

 

 

See more:

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/tropical-storm-harvey-forecast-texas-louisiana-arkansas

http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/10/us/five-things-september-10-trnd/index.html

http://www.businessinsider.com/hurricane-irma-size-intensity-florida-2017-9

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Hurricanes